Course Descriptions

BASIC SCIENCE CURRICULUM

Since Naprapathy is a specialized health science, it requires a curriculum that meets the criteria of serious study of the human sciences. Basic science courses provide a sound basis for the Revised: 11/4/16 12 education of Naprapaths. The program includes the study of Anatomy, Neuroscience, Kinesiology, Physiology, Histology, Pathology, Biochemistry and Nutrition. The Basic Sciences are taught primarily in relation to the human organism. It is necessary to understand the structure and the functions of the organs’ bodily dysfunctions and the ways that these dysfunctions can manifest themselves. Homeostasis is stressed throughout the study of the human body. Basic Science course content is reviewed and updated on an ongoing basis, with input from Naprapathic and Basic Science faculty through the Advisory Board. Basic Science and Naprapathic courses are designed to complement one another. The curriculum strives to integrate both approaches to learning.

ANAT 501 ANATOMY I – 3 credits – Online Course

A study of anatomy and biomechanics of the human anatomy, including the back and extremities,
and brachial and lumbosacral plexi. Case studies specific to the structure and function of the
extremities are presented. Instructional methods include lectures, assessments, and reading
assignments.
Prerequisite: College Level Biology or its equivalent

ANAT 502 ANATOMY II – 3 credits – Online Course

A study of anatomy of the skull foramina, human brain, spinal cord and vertebral column, special
senses, heart and circulation, and respiration. Instructional methods include lectures, assessments,
and reading assignments.
Prerequisite: ANAT 501 Anatomy I and PHYS 501 Physiology I

ANAT 503 ANATOMY III – 3 credits – Online Course

A study of the structure and function of the regional areas of the human viscera with emphasis on
systems: Digestive, Reproductive, and Urinary. Also included are structures of the head and neck,
cervical, brachial and lumbosacral plexi. Instructional methods include lectures, assessments, and
reading assignments.
Prerequisite: ANAT 502 Anatomy II and PHYS 502 Physiology II.

BCHM 501 BIOCHEMISTRY I – 3 credits – Online Course

Studies the structures and functions of proteins and enzymes such as amino acids and peptides;
the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the respiratory chain, oxidative phosphorylation,
citric acid cycle, glycolysis, ketogenesis and the synthesis of cholesterol.
Included are the biosynthesis of essential and non-essential amino acids and the catabolism of
amino acids.
Prerequisite: College Level Biology and Chemistry
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BCHM 502 BIOCHEMISTRY II – 3 credits – Online Course

Describes the structure, function and replication of macromolecules: extracellular and
intracellular communication, actions of the pituitary, hypothalamus, thyroid, adrenal cortex,
adrenal medulla, gonads and pancreas. Special topics covered are nutrition, metabolism of
xenobiotics, cancer, and genetic basis of the disease.
Prerequisite: BCHM 501 Biochemistry I.

EPBM 500 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY/BIOMECHANICS – 3 credits – Online Course

A specific approach for understanding the various control systems that integrate the function
between the nervous and endocrine systems at rest and as they adapt to the various stresses. These
fundamental physiological principals are presented in a biomechanical context with an emphasis
on the laws governing force vectors and their effects in acquiring appropriate axial and
appendicular skeleton joint mobility and range of motion.
Prerequisite: ANAT 503 Anatomy III and PHYS 503 Physiology III

HIST 500 HISTOLOGY- GENETICS-EMBRYOLOGY- 3 credits – Online Course

Microscopic study of tissues and how they form organs and organ systems. Provides a foundation
for further study of physiology and pathology. Study in the structural and functional
characteristics of embryological development, with emphasis on the first trimester of pregnancy,
the principles of genetics are explored to understand the anomalies and their effects on
individuals.
Prerequisite: College Level Biology or its equivalent

KINE 500 KINESIOLOGY – 3 credits – Online Course

An interdisciplinary study stressing principles of human biomechanics. An analysis of the
interactions of the bone, joint, muscle and nerve morphophysiology as they affect the mechanisms
of human movement, in order to provide a basis upon which to differentiate normal from
pathophysiologically altered motion.
Prerequisite: ANAT 503 Anatomy III and PHYS 503 Physiology III

MBME 603 MIND-BODY MEDICINE – 3 credits – Online Course

Science has revealed that the mind and body are intimately connected in ways we haven’t
previously realized – now this field of knowledge is evolving to our understanding of health and
disease.
This course explores the history, development and evidence base for an approach called
biopsychosocial medicine, in which biology, psychology, and sociocultural factors are examined
as both independent and interactive contributors to health and disease.
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This conceptual model is first introduced, followed by essential biomedical building blocks, an
exploration of psychological and sociological variables, and applications to organ systems and
common chronic diseases.
This course draws from diverse research traditions, poignant clinical narratives and active
demonstrations compiled from nearly 20 years of educational training programs in medicine,
nursing, psychology and anthropology.
By exploring both biological as well as psychosocial factors related to health, you will graduate
with a cutting-edge understanding of how the stress, relationship, work, etc. gets inside to alter
the functioning of our minds and bodies.
Prerequisite: PATH 502 Pathology of Human Diseases II.

MTGE 500 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY – 3 credits – Online Course

The structure and formation of technical terms used in the health sciences, based on roots and
elements from Greek and Latin.
Prerequisite: None

MPHE 500 MICROBIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH – 3 credits – Online Course

A fundamental approach focusing on select organisms and the diseases they cause. Some topics
include classification and taxonomy, microbial genetics, infection, and resistance.
Case studies relevant to Doctors of Naprapathy are presented.
Prerequisite: ANAT 503 Anatomy III and PHYS 503 Physiology III.

NEUR 501 NEUROSCIENCE I – 3 credits – Online Course

Emphasis placed on the structure and function of the cerebellum, basal ganglia, cranial nerves,
cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and special senses. Case studies relevant to specific neurological
disorders are presented.
Prerequisite: ANAT 503 Anatomy III and PHYS 503 Physiology III.

NEUR 502 NEUROSCIENCE II – 3 credits – Online Course

The basic organization and neurophysiology of the central nervous system are presented. Topics
include anatomy of the brain stem, spinal cord, and blood circulation, cerebrospinal fluid
dynamics, spinal nerve reflexes, descending and ascending pathways. Case studies specific to the
function of the nervous system are presented.
Prerequisite: NEUR 501 Neuroscience I

PATH 501 PATHOLOGY OF HUMAN DISEASES I – 3 credits – Online Course

The first of a two quarter sequence introducing concepts of inflammation, neoplasia, pathogenesis
and clinical presentation of various organic disease processes. Topics include: arteriosclerosis,
angina, vascular disease and myocardial infarction. Case studies are incorporated into the course.
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Prerequisite: HIST 500 Histology, ANAT 503 Anatomy III & PHYS 503 Physiology III

PATH 502 PATHOLOGY OF HUMAN DISEASES II – 3 credits – Online Course

As a continuation of PATH 501, the course includes a study of the kidneys, liver and pancreas,
lungs and pleura, central and peripheral nervous systems, musculoskeletal disorders, male and
female genitourinary disorders, and diseases of the female breast.
Prerequisite: PATH 501 Pathology of Human Diseases I.

PHYS 501 PHYSIOLOGY I – 3 credits – Online Course

Physiological processes of the organ systems and the drive toward homeostasis. Study of structure
and function of cells, movement of molecules across cell membranes, nerve transmission and the
autonomic nervous system, cellular metabolism and genetic information.
Prerequisite: College Level Biology or its equivalent.

PHYS 502 PHYSIOLOGY II – 3 credits – Online Course

Study of control mechanisms: Chemical messengers, membrane potentials, synapses, hormones.
Determinant factors of body movement, consciousness, behavior, sensory systems.
Prerequisite: ANAT 501 Anatomy I and PHYS 501 Physiology I.

PHYS 503 PHYSIOLOGY III – 3 credits – Online Course

Cardiovascular patterns in health and disease: covers circulation, regulation of blood pressure,
respiration, digestion and absorption, regulation of metabolism, reproduction, and defense
mechanisms. Includes issues of homeostasis in relation to kidney function, blood volume, etc.
Prerequisite: ANAT 502 Anatomy II and PHYS 502 Physiology II.

SNDI 501 SCIENCE OF NUTRITION AND DIET I – 3 credits – Online Course

A comprehensive study of the basic principles of nutrition; biochemical classification of foods
and dietary supplements to promote and maintain wellness. Focuses on the function of
proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Discusses consequences of vitamin and
mineral deficiencies.
Prerequisite: BCHM 502 Biochemistry II

SNDI 502 SCIENCE OF NUTRITION AND DIET II – 3 credits – Online Course

The course incorporates the study of food and food supplementation as related to health and
prevention of disease. Presents essentials of therapeutic nutritional programs, dietary counseling,
and nutritional health disorders.
Prerequisite: SNDI 501 Science of Nutrition and Diet I.
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STBD 500 STRESS AND THE BODY – 3 credits – Online Course

The course marches through various parts of the body (e.g., heart, stomach wall, immune system)
or physiological functions (e.g., sleep, learning, and memory), examining how stress is
experienced on each of those systems.
The course examines the mechanisms of psychological stress, and its relevance to depression,
anxiety and addiction. We examine the role of personality differences in explaining why some
individuals cope with stress better than others and we explore what socioeconomic status has to
do with stress and health.
Prerequisite: PATH 502 Pathology of Human Diseases II.

NAPRAPATHIC SCIENCE CURRICULUM

The course of study in Naprapathic theory and practice includes a logical sequence of study with increasing emphasis placed on the development of clinical skills.

Building upon the knowledge of anatomical structure and function, as well as physiological
response, the Naprapathic courses train the student to evaluate connective tissue disorders and how these disorders affect neurological control of the connective tissues. They lay a foundation for the proper application of Naprapathic therapeutic techniques. Additionally, the student is introduced to techniques of nutritional counseling and patient education, and the ethical, legal and management skills required in clinical practice. By the time students enter their internship, they have thoroughly studied human structure, function and they dysfunction and developed analytical and manipulative skills using the charts and symbols of Naprapathy, sufficient to apply their knowledge and skill in a supervised clinical setting.

ACTC 601 ACCESSORY TECHNIQUE I – 3 credits – Lab

Presents methods of joint and soft tissue examination including range of motion, kinesiological
and neurological testing as well as Naprapathic palpation. Instruction emphasizes research
developments in all areas of spinal and extra-spinal manipulation particularly as they apply to
Naprapathic principles. Course content includes lecture, demonstration, and practicum on such
topics as spinal articular facet and disc problems, inflammatory connective tissue disorders,
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analysis and treatment of the extremities and rib cage, and TMJ syndrome. A hands-on practicum
provides the opportunity to apply principles of spinal and extra-spinal manipulation.
Prerequisites: NTEC 601 Naprapathic Technique I and CEVL 601 Naprapathic Clinical
Evaluation I

ACTC 602 ACCESSORY TECHNIQUE II – 3 credits – Lab

An advanced integration of therapeutic measures used by the Naprapath including: manipulation,
diet and exercise counseling, use of physical modalities, non-pharmaceutical and hygienic
interventions. Includes demonstrations and practical applications.
Prerequisites: ACTC 601 Accessory Technique I, CEVL 602 Naprapathic Clinical Evaluation II

APBM 500 APPLIED BIOMECHANICS 3 credits – Lab

The laws of human movement are presented. Students study the structure and function of human
joints in the thorax, vertebral column and extremities. Students are introduced to postural analysis
and the evaluation of specific work environments for ergonomic risk factors and appropriate
corrective measures.
Prerequisite:
KINE 500 Kinesiology, EPBM 500 Exercise
Physiology/Biomechanics

ATAT 701, 702, 703 ACCESSORY TECHNIQUE/ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY I, II, III – 3
credits – Lab

These three (one credit) courses, taught during the Clinic Internship, include lectures,
demonstrations and hands-on Intern participation. Material covered includes, but is not limited
to: Rose Technique, trigger point therapy, PNF, Lymphatic massage, and pediatric and geriatric
treatment approaches. Classes are taught by various Naprapathic practitioners and guest
instructors of other disciplines. Some classes will consist of “Clinic Review”, providing Interns
a forum for discussing individual patient cases with other Interns and a Clinician, thereby
exchanging ideas and other problem-solving techniques. The clinical application of these
therapies do not supplant, but rather complement the Oakley Smith Naprapathic Method of
treatment.
Prerequisite: Intern status

CPRP 600 CLINICAL PREPARATION – 3 credits – Lab

A composite of Naprapathic subjects will be presented during the first review. The students are
examined through discussion, quizzes and practical demonstrations in Naprapathic Charting,
Naprapathic evaluation, Naprapathic techniques and Nutritional counseling. The course trains the
students for the correct use of Naprapathic Case Records, clinical conduct and procedures, as well
as providing clinical observation. Presented immediately prior to entrance into the year of
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Internship, the course is designed to refresh and prepare the student for practical application of
academic Studies.
Prerequisite: Approval of Dean of Academics and Registrar

CONE 602 CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIC AND NEUROLOGIC EVALUATION – 3 credits – Lab

Teaches the evaluation of spinal and extra-spinal neuron-musculoskeletal conditions. Provides a
hands-on review by body region in which the student carries out ortho/neuro examinations for
clinical evaluations.
Prerequisite: Advanced Status

CEVL 601 NAPRAPATHIC CLINICAL EVALUATION I – 3 credits – Lab

A study of Naprapathically ascertained syndromes of vertebral and extra-vertebral articulations,
evaluation of particular types of soft and osseous tissue disorders found to exist, and the
determination of a specific treatment for each type of involvement. Students become proficient
in the use of signs, symbols, charts and definitions used by Naprapaths to record specific findings
in the evaluation of the pelvic and sacral syndromes.
Prerequisite: SANC 401 Spinal Anatomy/Naprapathic Chartology

CEVL 602 NAPRAPATHIC CLINICAL EVALUATION II – 3 credits – Lab

A continuation of Naprapathic Clinical Evaluation 501 with emphasis on the thoracic and lumbar
areas. Hands on evaluation of the thoracic/lumbar spinal articulations to determine pathological
syndromes. Prerequisite: SANC 401 Spinal Anatomy/Naprapathic Chartology
CEVL 603 NAPRAPATHIC CLINICAL EVALUATION III – 3 credits – Lab
Emphasis is placed on the cervical region and an integrated analysis of individual syndromes in
the context of the whole body, finishing with the performance of fully charted treatments.
Prerequisite: SANC 401 Spinal Anatomy/Naprapathic Chartology

CTDY 501 CONNECTIVE TISSUE DYNAMICS I – 3 credits – Lab

This is the first of a three quarter course which integrates the basic science of connective tissues
with the Naprapathic approach to soft tissue evaluation. Lectures and hands-on lab present
different types of connective tissues in health and disease. Laboratory gives the student
experience in palpation of the physiological states of various types of connective tissues.
Prerequisite: ANAT 501 Anatomy I, HIST 500 Histology

CTDY 502 CONNECTIVE TISSUE DYNAMICS II – 3 credits – Lab

Lectures and laboratory provide in-depth experience of connective tissue: loose, dense, etc. The
formation of scar tissue adhesions, nerve entrapments, pain syndromes and various other soft
tissue disorders are studied experientially. An introduction to the treatment of soft tissue disorders
is an integral part of the course.
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Prerequisite: ANAT 501 Anatomy I, HIST 500 Histology

CTDY 503 CONNECTIVE TISSUE DYNAMICS III – 3 credits – Lab

This is the last of a three quarter class. Lectures and laboratory provide in-depth experience of
connective tissue: loose, dense, etc. The formation of scar tissue adhesions, nerve entrapments,
pain syndromes and various other soft tissue disorders are studied experientially. An introduction
to the treatment of soft tissue disorders is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ANAT 501 Anatomy I, HIST 500 Histology

HPP 600 NAPRAPATHIC HISTORY, PRINCIPLES, PHILOSOPHY, – 3 credits

Presents the rationale for Naprapathic principles, theories and techniques. Covers the history of
Naprapathy from its origins up to the present, the evolution of its philosophy principles and an
introduction to the ethical principles of Naprapathic treatments.
Prerequisite: None

NTEC 601 NAPRAPATHIC TECHNIQUE I – 3 credits

Instruction and demonstration in the use of the hands and body to apply manipulative pressure to
specific areas of an individual’s body should a condition exist that prevents normal functioning.
The goal of Naprapathic technique is to restore homeostasis. Application of specific Naprapathic
techniques to the thoracic and Lumbo-sacral areas.
Prerequisite: CEVL 601 Naprapathic Clinical Evaluation I and SANC 401 Spinal
Anatomy/Naprapathic Chartology

NTEC 602 NAPRAPTHIC TECHNIQUE II – 3 credits

Continuation of Technique 501 with emphasis on refining and correlating application of the
Naprapathic Technique especially for the cervical and pelvic areas. Students will be introduced
to the Nerve Function Principle from the historical document, Naprapathic Therapeutics.
Prerequisite: NTEC 601 Naprapathic Technique I & CEVL 602 Naprapathic Clinical Evaluation
II

RAD 600 RADIOLOGICAL REPORT INTERPRETATION AND NORMAL RADIOLOGIC
ANATOMY – 3 credits – Lab

An overview addressing normal skeletal radiology with an emphasis on radiological report
interpretation and clinical case correlation. Special tests to be covered include primarily plain
film x-ray and MRI, but also CT, Diagnostic Ultrasound, and DEXA exams as well. Student goals
should be interpretation of radiological reports to be able to make clinical decisions based on said
reports and translate said reports to patients for their clinical benefit. Population studies will be
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discussed as well as the degree of certain radiological abnormalities and their relation to
Naprapathic Treatment. Prerequisite: Path 501 Pathology I

REHB 600 PRINCIPLES OF REHABILITATION – 3 credits – Lab

An overview addressing the problem of de-conditioning that accompanies most persistent pain
syndromes and disuse atrophy. Students learn the art of blending passive and active care of the
patient, evaluation of deficits in activities of daily living, functional restoration or
accommodation, and the need for patient education in the management of exercise, joint
protection, and environmental and intrinsic stressors—a companion course to Therapeutic
Exercise.
Prerequisites: SANC 600 Spinal Anatomy/Naprapathic Chartology, THEX 600 Therapeutic
Exercise or consent of Instructor

SANC 600 SPINAL ANATOMY/NAPRAPATHIC CHARTOLOGY – 3 credits – Lab

A comprehensive study of the anatomical structures and functional dynamics of the spine and the
associated structures both intrinsic and extrinsic, as well as Naprapathic connective tissue
terminology. Identification and usage of the charting system for recording the Naprapathic
examination and treatment plan.
Prerequisite: ANAT 502 Anatomy II, PHYS 502 Physiology II
SEIA 600 SPORTS AND EXERCISE INJURY ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT – 3 credits
– Lab
An overview of sport and exercise injury assessment, treatment protocols and various forms of
rehabilitation.
Prerequisite: Advanced status

THEX 600 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE – 3 credits – Lab

Emphasis is placed on integrating specific exercises into the treatment session and customizing
home exercise to facilitate the attainment of treatment objectives and goals. General fitness,
preventive/ maintenance exercises are included to enhance a patient’s rehabilitation and prevent
injury—a companion course to Principles of Rehabilitation.
Prerequisite: None

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND INTERNSHIP 45 credits – Internship

This phase of the Naprapathic education provides the students with direct clinical experience.
The clinical internship develops confidence, refines Naprapathic skills, and provides the students
with opportunities to experience common patient situations that arise in the everyday Naprapathic
practice. The intern is supervised by the clinic faculty, licensed Naprapaths, who impart their
knowledge and expertise in practical problem-solving skills, patient rapport, and adjunctive
therapies. The clinical preceptor on duty provide the interns with an ongoing progress report daily
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in areas of Naprapathic technique, professionalism, nutritional counseling and other clinic
activities. Quarterly examinations are administered by the clinical preceptors to reinforce
Naprapathic skills. Exams are forwarded to the University for grading and posting, by the
assigned instructor of record. During the fourth quarter the intern is required to complete a final
thesis/research project on a related topic which is pre-approved by the clinical preceptor and
University assigned instructor of record. Completed exams are forwarded to the University for
grading and posting.
Clinical experience provides for 64 credit hours for graduation which involves 450 clock hours
interning in the clinic under a licensed DN, and an additional 270 hours of Clinical Seminars and
Clinical Practice

CPRC 701, 702, 703, 704 CLINICAL PRACTICE – 15 credits – Internship

Mandatory sequence of Naprapathic program for students who have completed the academic
portion of the program. Interns use their Naprapathic skills to evaluate patients, administer
specific treatments for the presenting connective tissue disorder, and provide appropriate counsel.
Successful completion of the internship includes one calendar year (four semesters) served: (a)
minimum of 20 hours per week in supervised clinic practice; (b) administration of 350 full
evaluations; (c) performance of 100 nutritional counseling sessions; (d) successful completion of
clinical examinations; (e) attendance at all intern seminars; (f) satisfaction of all clinic academic
requirements as assigned. Interns are required to maintain a “B” average for clinic work.
Prerequisite: Intern Status

CSEM 701, 702, 703 INTEGRATIONAL CLINICAL SEMINARS – 4 credits – Online Course

Designed to prepare Interns to assume a professional role. Seminars are mandatory and are held
on a regular basis. Topics include: Effective business and practice management, principles of
effective professional communication, insurance management and business management for
setting up private practice. Other topics include, but are not limited to: nutritional counseling,
physiological therapeutics, orthoses, extremity rehab, protocols for pediatric and geriatric
treatments.
Prerequisite: Intern Status

CPEV 600 CLINICAL PROTOCOLS AND EVALUATION – 3 credits – Lab

Is designed to present students with integrative protocols to develop a foundational understanding
for treating connective tissue related disorders. Evaluation is based on signs and symptoms,
utilizing orthopedic and neurological evaluation, Naprapathic manipulative therapy, nutrition,
therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercises.
Prerequisite: Intern Status
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RESEARCH METHODS DISSERTATION – 35 credits – Online Course

Learning to think independently when approaching connective tissue problems and developing
a personal process for problem solving are important parts of lifelong Naprapathic education.
Each Naprapathic student at the Southwest University of Naprapathic Medicine is required to
successfully complete a major independent project including original research or application of
knowledge. The educational goal of the required research experience is for each student to learn
the importance and the process behind applying research methods to solve health and medical
problems, whether in clinical settings or a community. The research requirement consists of two
elements:
A communication component where the student must present a research project orally or in poster
format before a committee composed of three qualified readers.
A review of the literature, bibliography, and citations related to the topic of his/her presentation
conforming to a recognized writing manual. The student must submit a professionally written
scholarly paper related to the primary topic of the research project.
This research project is equivalent to 35 quarter credit hours to meet state requirements. The
project is broken down by each year, with the final project and oral presentation being due at the
end of the third year. A research/project committee will be composed of three qualified readers
who will review the project at various stages of development.